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Picturing present and potential pasture production

By Roger Gates Whitfield County CEC “Taking stock” is a phrase that means to “think carefully about a situation… so that you can decide what to do.” Historically, the phrase came from a farmer’s practice of counting the number of animals on the farm. Periodic livestock inventories provide important and…
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Grazing crop residues

By Charlotte Meeks Houston CEA Anyone that has managed cow/calf operations for more than a few days can tell you that the most expensive cost is feeding. Grazing is a cost-effective way of providing livestock with their nutritional needs. One method that can extend our gazing season involves grazing crop…
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The Next Bermudagrass Cultivar

By Dr. Bill Anderson, Research Geneticist, USDA-ARS When I started as perennial forage grass breeder for ARS sixteen years ago, the primary goal was to develop a cold-tolerant seeded bermudagrass since Tifton 85 seemed to satisfy the sprigged market. The battle was to develop a seeded forage that had high biomass…
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There’s an app for that

By Savannah Tanner Emanuel County CEA There’s an app for that…there’s always an app for that. In the midst of an ever-increasing technology world, the agricultural industry is no stranger to smart technology. From irrigation apps to field measuring apps, we see widespread, quick, and “at the touch of a…
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Weed control in pastures and hayfields

By Steve Morgan Harris County CEC Weeds can reduce the quantity and the stand life of desirable forage plants in pastures and hayfields. Weeds also impact the aesthetic value of a pasture. Therefore, producers may choose to initiate weed management strategies that reduce the impact of weeds on forage production….
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Successfully sprigging bermudagrass in Georgia

By Erin Forte Churchill Macon County CEC Improved bermudagrass varieties are often accepted as one of the best grazing materials in the Southeast, but the thought of establishing these varieties through sprigging can send even the best cattle producers running for the hills. It doesn’t have to! By following the steps outlined here, you can set…
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Research Update: Evaluating Glucose and Insulin Levels in Grazing Horses

From the January 2019 Issue of the University of Minnesota Extension – Horse Newsletter….

Research Update: Evaluating Glucose and Insulin Levels in Grazing Horses

Forage is a primary part of the horse’s diet and is often fed in the form of cool-season grasses, legumes or warm-season grasses. These forage types differ widely in their nutritional content. Two main differences are the nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC) and fiber content. Therefore, the goal of this research, conducted at the University of Minnesota, was to explore the nutrient values of the forages and their effects on horses.
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Should I burn my hayfield?

By Jeremy Kichler Colquitt County CEC Every year county agents get questions from producers concerning if they should burn their Bermuda grass hayfields. There are several benefits to burning your hayfield. Burning can help producers manage thatch in their stands. If the thatch layer becomes too thick over time then…
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Managing tall fescue toxicosis

By Adam Speir Madison County CEC Tall Fescue is a forage workhorse for livestock producers from north Georgia to New England. It is a cool-season perennial grass that is tolerant of many conditions, covers more than 1 million acres north of the Fall Line, and supplements bermudagrass pastures for many livestock producers from…
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