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Keeping Your New Year’s Resolution: Tall Fescue Replacement Information

Earlier this year, Matt Poore, cattle farmer, Professor and Extension Ruminant Nutrition Specialist made a New Year’s resolution to convert acres of toxic tall fescue to novel endophyte fescue on his farm. I jumped on the bandwagon and made the same resolution. Even though the non-toxic seed that completes these…
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I got all these thistles in my pasture!!

Thistles can reduce forage yield and delay spring transition of warm season grasses. Thistles can produce large amounts of seed, sometimes up to 4,000 seed per plant. For growers trying to manage the seed bank, please implement control strategies before flowering. Several different thistles are found in pastures, which can…
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Troubleshooting Oat Problems

Using oats as grazing and/ or baleage can sometimes be challenging however; in most years, oats can one of the healthiest and best options for our livestock. Some (most) years, UGA Extension gets calls concerning oats that are discolored, not growing great, or sometimes even dying. Unfortunately, there isn’t always…
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Should I Burn my Hayfield?

There are often many questions surrounding the practice of burning pastures and hayfields. Let’s look at the more frequently asked. Is it a good idea to burn my hayfield? There are several benefits to burning your hayfield. Burning can help producers manage thatch in their stands. If the thatch layer…
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Importance of Potassium

Potassium is an essential element in plants and is considered one of the three macronutrients, along with nitrogen and phosphorus. The amount of K is reported in almost all routine soil samples. Unfortunately, with price increases, it has gone from being the least expensive to the most expensive of the…
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How long can you go?

Are you looking to improve your grazing management system? The first step is to develop a grazing management plan! To better manage your grazing, you have to have goals. Our ultimate goals are to improve our efficiency, reduce pasture waste, conserve surplus forage, improve animal performance, and improve forage quality…
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Grazing Summer Annuals

While bermudagrass and bahiagrass are great warm season perennials, warm season annual grasses work well in a forage system to offer high quality forage throughout the summer months. There are several warm season annuals on the market with sorghum x sudangrass and pearl millet being the most popular. In this…
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Soil Health is Vital

Masks, hand washing, social distancing, vaccines, quarantine; words that are excessively familiar this day and time. What do you think of when you hear these words? My first thought is health. You have now began checking your website because you supposedly pulled up UGA Extension’s Forage Team Newsletter, but don’t…
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Testing for Nitrates in Your Forages

It seems like every summer I get calls from hay producers and cattlemen worried that a lack of timely rain or over-fertilization will cause their forage to be high in nitrates. Every winter I get calls from producers with dead cattle or late term abortions, that are worried that the…
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Successful Tall Fescue Conversion – Part 1

In the Piedmont and northern Georgia, UGA Extension recommends planting tall fescue between September 1 and October 15. So, why discuss planting in March? In areas where tall fescue is adapted, conversion of toxic Kentucky-31 pastures and hayfields to a non-toxic, novel endophyte variety represents one of the most financially…
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