UGA Forage Extension Team

There’s an app for that

By Savannah Tanner Emanuel County CEA There’s an app for that…there’s always an app for that. In the midst of an ever-increasing technology world, the agricultural industry is no stranger to smart technology. From irrigation apps to field measuring apps, we see widespread, quick, and “at the touch of a…
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Get prepped for hay season

By Carole Knight Bulloch County CEA As temperatures begin to creep up and spring starts to arrive, it is time to start thinking about the coming hay season. Timing is everything when it comes to high-quality hay production. A pre-harvest inspection of your hay making equipment can help make up…
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Weed control in pastures and hayfields

By Steve Morgan Harris County CEC Weeds can reduce the quantity and the stand life of desirable forage plants in pastures and hayfields. Weeds also impact the aesthetic value of a pasture. Therefore, producers may choose to initiate weed management strategies that reduce the impact of weeds on forage production….
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Successfully sprigging bermudagrass in Georgia

By Erin Forte Churchill Macon County CEC Improved bermudagrass varieties are often accepted as one of the best grazing materials in the Southeast, but the thought of establishing these varieties through sprigging can send even the best cattle producers running for the hills. It doesn’t have to! By following the steps outlined here, you can set…
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Research Update: Evaluating Glucose and Insulin Levels in Grazing Horses

From the January 2019 Issue of the University of Minnesota Extension – Horse Newsletter….

Research Update: Evaluating Glucose and Insulin Levels in Grazing Horses

Forage is a primary part of the horse’s diet and is often fed in the form of cool-season grasses, legumes or warm-season grasses. These forage types differ widely in their nutritional content. Two main differences are the nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC) and fiber content. Therefore, the goal of this research, conducted at the University of Minnesota, was to explore the nutrient values of the forages and their effects on horses.
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Choosing Alternative Feedstuffs – For Horses

From the January 2019 Issue of the University of Minnesota Extension – Horse Newsletter….

CHOOSING ALTERNATIVE FEEDSTUFFS

By: Marcia Hathaway, PhD, University of Minnesota

Horse owners may be exploring alternative feedstuffs due to high hay costs, poor quality hay, and/or challenges associated with finding sufficient quantities of hay. When possible, quality hay should make up a large portion of a horse’s diet. However, the following alternatives can replace hay, in partial or in whole, when needed. Always consider the pros and cons when selecting an appropriate alternative feedstuff, and before feeding, consult your an equine nutritionist and/or veterinarian.

 
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Be a good hay shopper

By Charlotte Meeks Houston County CEA When shopping for a new truck, you don’t buy just because the salesman says it’s a good deal. Most shoppers do their research, looking at body style, fuel mileage, towing capabilities, included options and a vehicle history. Shopping for hay should also be carefully…
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Should I burn my hayfield?

By Jeremy Kichler Colquitt County CEC Every year county agents get questions from producers concerning if they should burn their Bermuda grass hayfields. There are several benefits to burning your hayfield. Burning can help producers manage thatch in their stands. If the thatch layer becomes too thick over time then…
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Taking a good forage sample

By Ray Hicks Screven County CEC Forages are the basis of most of our livestock enterprises. Moreover, the nutritional make up of that forage should be the foundation of a balanced diet for our livestock but many times this is took for granted. Many factors (e.g. variety, maturity, growing conditions,…
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Posted in Hay.

Managing tall fescue toxicosis

By Adam Speir Madison County CEC Tall Fescue is a forage workhorse for livestock producers from north Georgia to New England. It is a cool-season perennial grass that is tolerant of many conditions, covers more than 1 million acres north of the Fall Line, and supplements bermudagrass pastures for many livestock producers from…
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