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Black Twig Borers

Over the last two years, we’ve received a number of calls from local clients concerning landscape trees that have a lot of branch dieback. Black twig borers or other ambrosia beetles are often involved in these cases.  Stunted or delayed leaf development and rapid wilting in the spring are classic…
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Effects of Lawn Herbicides on Landscape Trees and Shrubs

This presentation is geared toward certified arborists, landscapers, master gardeners, and home gardeners that commonly use phenoxy herbicides for lawn weed control. This particular presentation focuses on the potential for phenoxy herbicides to affect non-target trees and woody ornamentals in landscape settings due to poor application choices by professionals. This is an issue that is commonly encountered in the landscape and arboriculture industry, as seen by numerous plant samples submitted to local Extension offices diagnosed with phenoxy herbicide injury. One focus of the training details a case study example showing the potential for tree injury from root absorption of phenoxy herbicides and highlighting possible liability if not used appropriately. The purpose of this presentation is to raise awareness in the industry about this important issue and provide practical tips on avoiding potential damage and liability.
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Annual Tree Checkups

Maintaining trees is a lot like getting a routine dental cleaning—good, bad, or otherwise.   If you don’t maintain your teeth or have them checked periodically by a dentist, then you run the risk of your teeth having major problems in the long term. Trees share many similarities to teeth. Older…
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Old Trees Bleeding Sap

Question: There’s an old oak tree in my back yard with sap oozing out. During the summer, the sap was covered with bees and other insects. What’s causing this to happen and is this harmful to my tree? Bacterial wetwood or “slime flux” is a condition in trees that is…
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A Good Year for Peaches

This might end up being a great year for peaches and other fruit trees in Georgia. That is assuming we don’t have another hard freeze between now and mid-April. Georgia is known as the peach state, although California and South Carolina actually grow more peaches. Georgia, of course, has the…
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