Climate and Agriculture in the Southeast

Why you can smell rain

Since rain is in the forecast, I thought you might be interested in this story from EarthSky about what we call “petrichor”, which is basically the musky, earthy odor we smell when it starts raining. It is not the rain itself that has an odor, but the moisture releases chemicals…
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Georgia Climate Project: How has the changing risk of extreme weather events impacted the costs of climate change?

Our latest question from the Georgia Climate Project’s Roadmap of important research questions on Georgia’s future climate vulnerability addresses the changing risk of extreme events such as hurricanes, floods and droughts. It asks how the changes in the risks is affecting the costs of addressing climate change on different time…
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New methods for estimating precipitation

In the last few weeks I have run across two new methods for estimating precipitation amounts in places where no rain gauge is present (which is most of the US). These methods incorporate new techniques for filling in the gaps between surface rain gauges using radar data. NOAA’s National Centers…
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Georgia Climate Project: How can Georgia increase climate sequestration in agriculture and forestry?

This week’s question from the Georgia Climate Project’s Roadmap has to deal with opportunities that Georgians might have for capturing carbon from the air using trees or agricultural techniques. Pulling carbon dioxide from the air has the benefit of reducing the increase in greenhouse gases that is occurring across the…
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