Recent Posts

  • If you’re having trouble growing fruit in our area, did you know that the Extension office can help identify what’s going on? I’ve had several samples brought to me in the last few weeks off of plum, pear, and peach trees. Unfortunately, every single one of them has had the same problem – insect damage…

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  • When my parents moved houses last year, their new residence had a number of hydrangeas established in the landscape. They aren’t my mom’s preferred plant, so this spring they dug them out and gave them to me. I was concerned that they were going to struggle with transplant stress and erratic watering due to my…

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  • In the last two weeks, I’ve had multiple phone calls, emails, and site visits relating to trees and shrubs that aren’t looking so good.  These types of calls are common during this time of year – now that plants are starting to green up, grow leaves, and set fruit, any problems or trouble they might…

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  • Hopefully you were able to take a look at last week’s article discussing what to do if you are seeing plant dieback in your trees and shrubs. If not, the short version is: we have to identify what the cause of the trouble is before we can find a solution, so call (706-359-3233) my office…

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  • A few weeks ago I was able to visit with a colleague of mine down in south Georgia whose county produces over $12 million dollars in watermelons each year – roughly $6k per acre in profit. While I don’t necessarily recommend that you try to grow watermelons at quite that big of a scale, they…

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  • For the last thirteen years, Brood XIX, or the Great Southern Brood of periodical cicadas have been living underground as nymphs, feeding on hardwood plant roots. If a mature tree wasn’t present 13 years ago, if the tree was cut down since that time period, or if the tree is not a hardwood species, cicadas…

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  • I recently had a call from a gentleman who had cleared some property around a house and was looking for a good ground cover to hold the soil and look nice as he prepared to sell it. While I’ve written fairly frequently about the benefits of cool-season annual grass species such as annual ryegrass for…

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  • Last week I received a call in the office for a couple that had a honey bee swarm at their house and were looking for someone to help remove it. While UGA Extension doesn’t provide bee removal, we do try our best to connect beekeepers with homeowners looking for honey bee removal. Honey bee swarms…

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  • With Masters Week upon us, I was asked if I could highlight some of the agriculture related to the Augusta National Golf Course and famous tournament – in all honesty, I’m surprised I haven’t thought to do this before now! Prior to 1856, the property on which the Augusta National sits was an indigo plantation.…

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  • If you’re interested in growing plants of any kind, it’s important that you understand how important your soil is. From a conservation standpoint, soil helps filter rainwater, preventing contaminants from entering the aquifer, and regulates runoff into the ground, which prevents flooding.  Soil is an important sequester of carbon, provides a home to fungi, bacteria,…

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