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“Farming in the South trickier than in Midwest”

Southeast Farm Press had an interesting article in their newsletter this week from Todd David of the University of Kentucky Extension comparing farming in the South to farming in the Midwest.  In the article he says that “The lower yield potential and greater yield risk reduces land value appreciation in the South and limits the opportunity to build equity as in the Midwest.”  He also looks at differences in crop insurance and in soils.

He does not mention differences in climate, which may be more of a factor in the future as the country continues to trend upward in temperature.  The Southeast is expected to benefit from a longer growing season which may allow more double-cropping and new crop types but could also see more frequent droughts, while the Midwest will have a longer growing season and more rain which could help them with a greater choice of crops in the future.

A South Carolina farmer chops down his corn after his yield was declared too low to be worth harvesting. Source: David DeWitt / Clemson University via Southeast Farm Press

A South Carolina farmer chops down his corn after his yield was declared too low to be worth harvesting. Source: David DeWitt / Clemson University via Southeast Farm Press