mrabney

  • The recent advent of hotter and drier weather has brought with it the first reports of lesser cornstalk borers (LCB) in Georgia peanut fields. I have also gotten a number of calls and texts over the last 10 days about foliage feeding caterpillars at or near threshold. I have not personally identified any of the…

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  • Cotton, Peanut, and Soybean Scout School will be held at the Southeast Georgia Research and Education Center in Midville on Tuesday, June 11. This program offers basic information on insect pest identification and damage, natural enemies, and scouting procedures. The training will serve as an introduction to insect monitoring for new scouts and as a…

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  • Managing Thrips in Peanut

    Peanut planting season is well underway in Georgia, and the insect issue of greatest concern this time of year is thrips. The feeding injury caused by these tiny insects will slow seedling growth and can result in lost yield. More importantly, thrips transmit Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus which can have devastating impact on peanut yield.…

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  • Garden Fleahoppers in Peanut

    I have gotten several reports of building populations of garden fleahoppers (GFH) in peanut (and other crops) over the last couple weeks. Below is a UGA Peanut Entomology blog post from a few years ago about GFH that will give you some basic information about the insect. As always, if you have questions about garden…

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  • Velvetbean caterpillars (VBC) have become abundant in Georgia peanut fields over the last 10 days. Growers that do not have a scout or consultant should check their fields for infestations TODAY. Over the course of the last week I have seen fields stripped to bare stems and have heard of caterpillar counts up to 15…

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  • Foliage Feeding Caterpillars

    After thrips, foliage feeding caterpillars are the most often treated insect pest in Georgia peanut fields. While it is certainly not uncommon for caterpillar infestations to reach the economic threshold (the threshold ranges from 4 to 8 caterpillars per row foot depending on crop condition), not every peanut field in the state will need to…

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  • The 2023 peanut growing season did not start out hot and dry, but nobody bothered to tell the lesser cornstalk borers (LCB). This pest is generally only a serious problem when temperatures are in the 90s and rainfall is scarce; nevertheless, LCB populations were reaching threshold levels in peanut fields all across Georgia by the…

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  • Thrips and Lesser Cornstalk Borers

    We are at the point in the growing season where a lot of Georgia peanut fields are 25 to 35 days after planting. Though thrips pressure has not been particularly high in 2023, it doesn’t take many adults per plant to produce a damaging population of immatures on peanut. Thrips injury typically peaks around 28…

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  • Peanut planting time has arrived in Georgia, and that means thrips season is here as well. Many of the decisions a peanut grower makes at planting will affect the risk of thrips infestation and the risk of Tomato spotted wilt disease. By now, growers should have a plan for managing thrips and TSWV, but here…

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  • The July rain in South Georgia will reduce the severity of lesser cornstalk borer infestations in many fields and will at least buy us some time before spider mites become a serious concern. If the rain continues through the remainder of the season, we will likely not have to battle either of these pests over…

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