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“SUPER” EL NIÑO POISED TO DISRUPT WEATHER PATTERNS

Here is an article from David Zierden, Florida Climatologist, concerning the El Nino;

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(Satellite sea surface temperature departure from normal for November 1997 and July 2015.)

Tropical Pacific Heating up – Over the past several months, water temperatures in the central and eastern Pacific Ocean have been warming at an alarming rate, building one of the strongest El Niño’s in decades. El Niño refers to the appearance of unusually warm water along the equator from the coast of South America to the central Pacific that occurs every 2 to 7 years. Though commonly measured by sea surface temperatures, El Niño is actually a coupled ocean-atmospheric phenomenon that disrupts climate and weather patterns around the world.

Every El Niño differs in the timing of its evolution and the eventual strength, but this year’s El Niño has come on earlier and stronger than any recorded since 1950. Sea surface temperatures in the monitoring region soared to 2.2 degrees Celsius warmer than normal in August, a record for the month. The all-time record is 2.7 in November of 1997 during the strongest El Niño of this century. Forecasting centers around the world predict the current event to continue building in the next few months and it could approach the strength of the 1997/1998 and 1982/1983 events. It is virtually certain that this El Niño will affect our weather patterns through the spring of next year.

For the full article follow this link

“SUPER” EL NIÑO POISED TO DISRUPT WEATHER PATTERNS