Lowndes – Echols Ag News

Cotton Defoliation

Before we know it, it will be time to defoliate cotton. I attended a defoliation meeting Wednesday where Jared Whitaker, UGA cotton agronomist, spoke about different methods and chemicals used for defoliation. Some methods to determine when to defoliate include looking to see if 60 to 70% of bolls are open(we tend to wait for higher percentage to defoliate), sharp knife method and nodes above cracked boll. Attached are handouts that were given out at the meeting. If you have any questions, feel free to call the office. Also don’t forget we are scraping peanuts for maturity if you would like to take advantage of that service we provide.

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Unique Find in Soybean Field

A citizen mentioned to us about how she was having a bad snail problem in her subdivision and how it was only the houses bordering a soybean field. So we went and visited the field and there were snails on the plants. On one leaf we found 3 snails. They were inside the canopy and on the outside foliage. Dr. Roberts, UGA Extension Entomologist, said there is not a good control that is economical for a row crop field and he has never seen them reach the threshold to treat for them.

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Peanut Maturity Testing

It won’t be long before peanut harvesting will begin. Our office will be providing peanut hull scraping for any peanut grower. When bringing in a sample, we prefer vines to be brought in along with the peanuts so we can check the health of the vines.  When picking samples, take 5 or 6 adjacent plants from two or three spots in the field.  If the field changes soil types or has some dry land spots, then separate samples should be taken. A sample needs to have between 180-220 pods to show a good representation. Call the office if you have any questions.

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