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What is this strange growth on azalea leaves?

Leaf galls, caused by the fungus Exobasidium vaccinii, are common on azalea in the spring during wet, humid, cooler weather. The fungus invades expanding leaf and flower buds causing these tissues to swell and become fleshy, bladder-like galls. Initially, the galls are pale green to pinkish. Eventually, they become covered…
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Prolong the life of Poinsettias

The colorful bracts of poinsettias may stay bright for months if you care for them properly. Bright, indirect light and frequent watering are essential. Don’t allow the plants to wilt, but watering too often can damage roots. Poinsettias thrive on indirect, natural daylight — at least six hours a day….
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Protect Ornamentals from Cold Temperatures

November 2014 was one of the top five coldest Novembers on record for many weather stations across Georgia.  The three-month outlook for December through February continues to show the signs of an El Nino, which will bring cooler and wetter conditions to south Georgia through the winter months.  Cold damage to ornamental plants…
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“Rattlesnake weed” causes lawn owners headaches

Florida betony (Stachys floridana) (also called rattlesnake weed and hedge nettle) is a problem weed in both turfgrasses and ornamentals. Florida betony is a “winter” perennial and, like most plants in the mint (Labiatae) family, has a square stem with opposite leaves. Flowers are usually pink and have the classic mint-like structure….
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Time to plant Spring flowering bulbs

Spring-flowering bulbs have been on garden center shelves for weeks but the real season for planting them runs from late October to December. It’s best to wait to plant daffodil, tulip, hyacinth, Dutch iris, etc. until night temperatures are consistently below 60 degrees. At that time the soil is warm enough to stimulate…
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Start seeds now for Fall Garden

Start seeds in August for broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, kale, turnips, radishes, spinach, lettuce, beets and onions. It is best to use a store-bought potting mix to start seeds in containers, flats or trays. Place the seeds in a partially shaded spot and keep them watered, and you will have…
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